CG Colloquium Thursday November 15th

You are cordially invited to attend our Computer Graphics and Visualization Seminar on Thursday, November 15th, 2018, 15:45-17:45h, at Pulse-Hall 2.

The program features the following two speakers:


Huinan Jiang
Title
A Chebyshev Semi-Iterative Approach for Accelerating Projective and Position-based Dynamics
Abstract
In this paper, we study the use of the Chebyshev semi-iterative approach in projective and position-based dynamics. Although projective dynamics is fundamentally nonlinear, its convergence behavior is similar to that of an iterative method solving a linear system. Because of that, we can estimate the “spectral radius” and use it in the Chebyshev approach to accelerate the convergence by at least one order of magnitude, when the global step is handled by the direct solver, the Jacobi solver, or even the Gauss-Seidel solver. Our experiment shows that the combination of the Chebyshev approach and the direct solver runs fastest on CPU, while the combination of the Chebyshev approach and the Jacobi solver outperforms any other combination on GPU, as it is highly compatible with parallel computing. Our experiment further shows position-based dynamics can be accelerated by the Chebyshev approach as well, although the effect is less obvious for tetrahedral meshes. The whole approach is simple, fast, effective, GPU-friendly, and has a small memory cost.


Jesse Tilro
Title
Phase-Functioned Neural Networks for Character Control
Abstract
We present a real-time character control mechanism using a novel neural network architecture called a Phase-Functioned Neural Network. In this network structure, the weights are computed via a cyclic function which uses the phase as an input. Along with the phase, our system takes as input user controls, the previous state of the character, the geometry of the scene, and automatically produces high quality motions that achieve the desired user control. The entire network is trained in an end-to-end fashion on a large dataset composed of locomotion such as walking, running, jumping, and climbing movements fitted into virtual environments. Our system can therefore automatically produce motions where the character adapts to different geometric environments such as walking and running over rough terrain, climbing over large rocks, jumping over obstacles, and crouching under low ceilings. Our network architecture produces higher quality results than time-series autoregressive models such as LSTMs as it deals explicitly with the latent variable of motion relating to the phase. Once trained, our system is also extremely fast and compact, requiring only milliseconds of execution time and a few megabytes of memory, even when trained on gigabytes of motion data. Our work is most appropriate for controlling characters in interactive scenes such as computer games and virtual reality systems.